Wilbur Hackett, Jr.
Inducted: 1999

In 1966 Wilbur Hackett was All-Southern and All-State and also a Parade Magazine All-American. He played on the Crimson football team that year, and it was considered to be one of the best ever. Undefeated and untied during the regular season, they scored games over St. X, Flaget, and Trinity. They also won over Butler for the AAA State Championship. Wilbur Hackett was the star running back and line backer on defense. He was described as the finest all around player in Louisville. Wilbur then became a three year starter at linebacker at the University of Kentucky under two different coaches. In 1972, Wilbur left U of K, and married Brenda Phelps. He then went to work for the Criminal Justice Commission under Manual Hall of Famer, Ernie Allen. He styed with them until 1978, when he left to work for Sysco and Kentucky Fried Chicken. Then from 1986 until 1992 he was back working with the city again, with the Revenue Commission. Since 1992, he has been a supervior for Toyota Motor Corporation in Georgetown.

Carol Haddad 
Inducted: 1999

Currently Chairperson for the Jefferson County Board of Education, Carol Haddad has been a loyal supporter of duPont Manual High School during her School Board tenure from 1976-80 and 1992 to date. In her first term she assisted in keeping the tradition of the Male-Manual football game alive. She also provided support for the inception and continuance of Manual's magnet programs. In addition she was an active parent of two Manual students from 1975-83 supporting the PTSA as well as other school programs.

Dale Haines 
Inducted: 1996

Look in the dictionary under "loyalty" and one should find a picture of Dale Haines. A 1955 graduate, Dale served as manager of the Crimson track teams both his junior and senior years. That indomitable Manual spirit must have overtaken him while he was moving hurdles, because he has been devoted to the school ever since. At the souvenir game, Don Heavrin, Class of ’59 put the Male emblem on top and all pictures of Male were at the top of the page with Manual’s at the bottom. When the game was over, he thought he was going to have to fight Haines because he (Haines) was so angry that Male had been put on top of Manual. As it goes, Dale Haines will always call it the "Manual-Male" game as opposed to the "Male-Manual" game (a courtesy because Male is older than Manual).

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Doug Hamilton
Inducted: 1998

For a guy whose yearbook epitaph announced that his ambition was "to get out of school this year", Edward D. (Doug) Hamilton has done all right for himself. Doug has served as Chief of Police for the Louisville Division of Police since 1990, working his way through the ranks in traditional fashion all the way from patrolman where he started 27 years ago fresh out of Manual as a patrolmen riding a beat car in the Fifth District. Hamilton is currently a member of 20 civic organizations.

Stratton Owen Hammon 
Inducted: 1996

Stratton Owen Hammon’s epitaph in the 1922 Crimson Annual was prophetic: He is one of the greatest architects that Manual has ever produced, and he should be very successful when he gets into the "architectural world." By the time this was written, believe it or not, Hammon had already built his first house. He was only 16 when, in 1921, he constructed a $4,500 Cutch colonial home at 2024 Grasmere Drive while he worked part-time as a draftsman with the firm of M.J.Murphy. The house still stands, and he is now working on five houses.

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Elmer Hennessey
Inducted: 1998

The Shamrock Athletic Club has faded into oblivion, but in the forties and early fifties it gave one of the most prestigious awards in area sporting circles. And in 1946 that award honored Elmer Hennessey as the most valuable football player in the Falls Cities area. And why not? From 1945 through 1947 he was a fleet-footed halfback nicknamed the "Irish Mail" by one sportswriter, and "Hammerhead" by coach L. J. "Butch" Charmoli. All he did his senior season was lead the Crimsons to 10 wins against only one defeat (Gadsden, Alabama).

Joe Hutt
Inducted: 1996

Joe Hutt is the person most responsible for reviving the old Manual spirit that made Brook and Oak a symbol of togetherness. It started in the fall of 1987 when Joe decided to peruse the phone book in an attempt to find enough graduates to have a 50-year class reunion. Out of the original 225 graduates in 1940, Hutt recruited 95 to attend the 1990 affair, an impressive percentage. So when Lou Vassie was employed as the first alumni director of the modern era, it made sense to ask Joe to serve on the first Board of Directors. Joe’s enthusiasm has produced results. Since 1987 he has published 34 newsletters dedicated to his class and 11 others to Brook and Oak grads in general. He has also organized a "Day at the Races" at Churchill Downs twice a year and has sponsored quarterly luncheons at the Hurstbourne Country Club.

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J. G. Hunt Isert
Inducted: 1999

Hunt Isert's father and mother both died when he was in his early teens, and his sister died of diphtheria when she was only 10. At commencement in 1899, Principal H. G. Brownell made Isert a "fellow". This meant he was made a teacher at Manual for one year. After he was a teacher at Manual, he enrolled at Lehigh University, and graduated in 1905. He returned to Louisville to get a job with the Payne Company, which was a steel products firm for which he later became president and general manager. He was probably one of the best men there. He was also a three time president of the Alumni Association, Isert was also chairman of the campaign to raise money for the construction of Manual Stadium. With a goal of $60,000 set, he gathered together 4,111 people, who raised $75,000 in only one month. Since Isert was a construction engineer by trade, he physically assisted architect Arthur Tafel in the laying out and planning of the stadium. In 1924, when it was dedicated, it was considered the finest high school stadium in the country, and remains today a monument to Manual and to the people of the city of Louisville. Mr. J. G. Hunt Isert died on June 2, 1950.

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Irvine Jeffries
Inducted: 1998

Irvine Franklin Jeffries, class of 1926, was one of Manual’s first athletes to be nationally recognized. He was named Captain of an All-America team in basketball due primarily to the fact that he played on the 1923 state championship basketball team that made it through the third round of a national tournament at the University of Chicago. He also captained the basketball team in 1925. In football he was an All-Stater in both 1924 and 1925 and was also an All-Southern halfback in 1925. He also lettered in baseball three years.

Brad Jones
Inducted: 1999

Brad Jones was one of the greatest and most respected coaches to be at manual. Former Manual football coach and Hall of Famer, John Miehaus, admitted, "Of all the great coaching feats at Manual, Brad Jones’s 12 track titles has to be the greatest accomplishment of them all." He was a teacher of English and also coached football, basketball, baseball, and track. He moved to other schools and coached there too. He helped the schools he was at with anything he could do, including putting up bleachers, painting, and even selling hot dogs. When he died at the age of 95, L. E. "Brad" Jones was still coaching golf at Gerorgetown, no doubt the oldest active coach in the country.

Harry Jones 
Inducted: 1994

Graduated from Manual in 1948 after participating in football, track, and baseball. In 1961 he and his brother returned to Louisville and started Jones Plastics and Engineering Corporation, now a $150 million sales company, which manufactures plastic parts for the business machine, appliance and auto industries. He and Larry are both operating directors of Golden Foods and Golden Brands, a $100 million vegetable oil refinery operation. He is presently chairman of the Board of Directors for Republic Bank and Trust Co.

Junie Jones 
Inducted: 1995

Junie earned 10 varsity letters from 1934 to 1936. 3 each in football, basketball, and track and one for baseball his senior year. In 1937 he was presented with the Yale Cup for athletics and academics, Manual’s most coveted award in those days. He earned a football scholarship to U of K and earned three varsity letters there. He coached in Kentucky Schools for 40 years, beginning in 1945 as head football coach at Pikeville High. In 1964 Junie was voted P.E. teacher of the year in a 13 state region and was presented the award in Washington on behalf of president Lyndon Johnson. 

Larry Jones 
Inducted: 1994

Graduated from Manual in 1948 after participating in football, baseball, and track. . In 1961 he and his brother returned to Louisville and started Jones Plastics and Engineering Corporation, now a $150 million sales company, which manufactures plastic parts for the business machine, appliance and auto industries. He and Larry are both operating directors of Golden Foods and Golden Brands, a $100 million vegetable oil refinery operation. He is presently chairman of the Board of Directors for National City Bank.

Betty Greenwell Kassulke 
Inducted: 2000

Graduating in 1960, Kassulke became the longest standing female warden in the country. Before graduating from U of L in 1964, she worked as an associate with Dr. Raymond Kemper, conducting psychological testing with inmates, and she was intrigued by many personalities. Though she majored in Business Administration and Educational Psychology, she began her career as a teacher at the Kentucky Correctional Institutoin for Women. She kept her job until 1999- only leaving once for a year to marry Howard Kassulke. In 1986 she served as Interim Warden of the Kentucky State Reformatory and as Interim Warden at the Luther Luckett Correctional Complex. Through her years she was awarded with"Warden of the Year", "Outstanding Warden", "Woman of the Year" and the Governor's "Outstanding Kentuckian."

Beverly Keepers 
Inducted: 1997

Under Beverly Keeper’s leadership the school has won many local, state and national awards. Redbook Magazine, for example, has rated Manual in its top 100 schools in America for the last three years. The school has produced the greatest number of National Merit Semifinalists in Kentucky, also for the last three years. She has also overseen a $4 million renovation providing new cafeterias, libraries, science labs, windows, a roof and many exterior building repairs. She also supported the rebirth of the Alumni Association as a legitimate arm of the school.

Ralph Kimmel 
Inducted: 1995

Mr. Kimmel is credited with single-handedly making baseball a major sport at Manual. In 1991 Mr. Kimmel was inducted into the Kentucky High School Athletic Association Sports Hall of Fame. The school’s baseball field is also named after Mr. Kimmel. Mr. Kimmel began coaching the Manual baseball team in 1932. Mr. Kimmel won five state championships. His overall record form 1932 through 1961 was 559 wins and only 131 losses. He also won 10 district and regional titles.

H.F.A Kleinschmidt 
Inducted: 1997

Alfred Victor du Pont was Manual’s founder, but H.F.A was the one who whispered in the great benefactor’s ear. He was the first teacher of manual training in Louisville, having been hired in 1890 to extend tutelage to 24 freshmen boys at Male High. Before coming to Louisville from St. Louis he was principal or proffessor in six different schools and was a draftsman in the engineer’s office of the Northern Pacific Railroad Co. It was he who actually drew all the plans and specifications for the old building and its equipment. On April 15, 1895 he tendered his resignition.

Sherman Lewis 
Inducted: 1994

If not the greatest male athlete Manual ever produced, Sherman Lewis almost certainly stands as the fleetest. He led the 1960 track team to the KHSAA Championship. He was also the small halfback who led the Crimsons in an undefeated season and state championship. He went on to be named an All-American and finished third in balloting for the Heisman Trophy. He coached for Manual, the Spartans, San Francisco 49ers, and currently he is the offensive coordinator for the Green Pay Packers.

Joe Liedtke 
Inducted: 1999

Joe Liedtke served as Principal form 1979 to 1991. Of the nine principals who have served Manual, his tenure of 12 years is the third longest. He was instrumental in having Manual named as a National School of Excellence and supervised the transition of Manual's moving from a regular program to a magnet school. He has served as a member of numerous committees for the Jefferson County school district and has been on several National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) committees. In 1987 he was named Kentucky's Secondary Principal of the Year, and was one of 10 finalists for the National Principal of the Year award.

Victor Longstreet 
Inducted: 1994

Victor Mendell Longstreet, Manual Class of 1925 thinks he may be the only Manualite to be graduated magna cum laude from Harvard (1930). After leaving Harvard he went on to serve as a U.S. government official under every president from Herbert Hoover through Lydon Johnson. He is the author of Financial Control in Multi-National Companies, 1971.